The Narrowest Place on Earth Is in the Bahamas – And It Is a Bridge!

That strip of land that once existed is long gone now. The natural stone arch has in fact been swept away by hurricanes. However, today, in the same amazing spot, you can admire a wonder of nature. The most incredible thing is that all this is possible thanks to man’s hand. To better understand what this is all about, just know that we are in the Bahamas. We are talking about the Glass Window Bridge, the narrow strip of asphalt that divides the Atlantic Ocean from the blue Eleuthera Bay.

Where is Eleuthera

Eleuthera is one of the islands in the coral archipelago of Central America. It differs from the others because it has a very elongated and thin shape – just like the bridge that connects the two parts of the island. The result of this union between nature and human work is a majestic spectacle. This is the narrowest point on the island and, as such, it is also its most vulnerable point. Just think that in 130 years, the Glass Window Bridge has been rebuilt, or even repaired, countless times. And it has also earned the title of “the narrowest place on Earth“.

Visiting Bahamas Glass Window Bridge

If you are curious to know what you might expect from a visit to this masterpiece, know that the most spectacular view of the isthmus is definitely from above. But even crossing it on foot, by bike or by car is a unique experience. All around, among the rocks, the tide creates unthinkable natural pools. However, what is most striking is the difference in colour. In fact, the intense blue of the rippling ocean contrasts with the turquoise of the placid coral bay. Moreover, when a wave stronger than others breaks on the reef, the Atlantic dives into the lagoon. The result? A breathtaking spectacle and a guaranteed shower!

The panorama is also enriched by the variety of beaches that characterizes Eleuthera. The coasts of the island, in fact, vary from sandy beaches or small pebbles to large outcrops of ancient coral reefs. The entire western side overlooks the Great Bank of the Bahamas, offering wonderful tongues of fine sand that turn from white to pink. The scenery is completely different from that offered by the ocean side – despite the fact that a handful of rocks that gradually get lost under the tropical forest divide them.

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