We Deserve Fair Electric and Gas Rates sign now

Dutchess County Residents Deserve Fair Electric and Gas Rates

Assistant County Legislator Minority Leader Sandy Goldberg (D-Wappinger), County Legislator Margaret Fettes (D-Millbrook), County Legislator Barbara Jeter-Jackson (D-Poughkeepsie), County Legislator Rick Keller-Coffey (D-Poughkeepsie), and County Legislator Bill McCabe (D-Union Vale/Wappinger/La Grange) have agreed with to co-sponsor my resolution asking the state's Public Service Commission to reject Central Hudson's currently proposed electric and gas rate hikes.

Thanks to future Red Hook County Legislator Vicky Perry for endorsing this as well; note-- it is believed that County Legislators Roger Higgins and Fred Knapp would also agree with this effort; we just haven't been able to contact them in time for publishing of this petition.

Please contact our County Legislature at 486-2100, [email protected], or [email protected] on this.

NYS Public Service Commission: (800) 342-3377.

Denise D. VanBuren, Vice President of Corporate Communications and Community Relations for Central Hudson: 471-8323.

[Pass this petition along to all you know!]

Thanks!...

Joel Tyner
County Legislator (Clinton/Rhinebeck)
324 Browns Pond Road
Staatsburg, N.Y. 12580
[email protected]
(845) 876-2488
http://www.JoelTyner.org
http://www.MidHudsonAlliance.com

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Here below is the wording of the resolution Goldberg, Fettes, Jeter-Jackson, Keller-Coffey, McCabe, and Tyner have put before our County Legislature on this:

REJECT CENTRAL HUDSON'S PROPOSED RATE INCREASE REQUEST FOR GAS AND ELECTRICITY

WHEREAS, "Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corporation Friday filed its largest rate-increase request with the Public Service Commission since at least 1980," according to the Poughkeepsie Journal July 30th, and

WHEREAS, a July 29th press release from Central Hudson itself stated that, "the typical residential customer might expect to see his/her total electric bill increase by 17 percent, or approximately $10 per month; an average residential natural gas heating customer should expect to see a 16-percent increase in total bills, or about $20 per month when averaged over 12 months," and

WHEREAS, as it is now, even before Central Hudson's recently proposed rate hike would take effect, Central Hudson's "electric customers can expect to pay about 15 percent more this July than they did a year ago, even if they use the same amount of power," according to the Middletown Record July 21st, Gannett Papers columnist Jay Gallagher July 23rd, and the Daily Freeman July 25th, and

WHEREAS, raising electric and gas rates as Central Hudson now proposes to do would be an unfair hardship for our county's local small businesses, ordinary ratepayers, school/town taxpayers, and county taxpayers; last year Central Hudson received $1,335,743.79 from Dutchess County for 'public utilities electric, light, gas, and power', according to the County Comptroller's annual vendor's list report, and

WHEREAS, Central Hudson's parent company CH Energy Group admitted in May that they made $42 million in 'net income' (profits) last year; this was publicized at the Edison Electric Institute's Annual Finance Committee meeting, and

WHEREAS, according to CH Energy Group itself in the May report, it is "a profitable, low-risk utility in a diversified and growing market; a profitable competitive subsidiary with a multi-state footprint and attractive growth prospects," and

WHEREAS, "CH Energy Group reported net income of $6 million, or 37 cents per diluted share, for the second quarter of 2005, up from a profit of $5.5 million, or 34 cents per share, during the second quarter of 2004; revenue was $837.9 million, up from $786.7 million a year ago," according to the Middletown Record July 21st, and therefore be it

RESOLVED, that the Dutchess County Legislature hereby request that the state's Public Service Commission reject Central Hudson's currently proposed electric and gas rate hikes, and be it further

RESOLVED, that a copy of this resolution be sent to County Executive William Steinhaus and our state's Public Service Commission.

********************************************

CH Energy Group's May report at Edison Electric Institute's Annual Finance Committee meeting
http://library.corporate-ir.net/library/76/764/76406/items/152857/052005.pdf .

********************************************

Note as well-- Central Hudson's own March 11th SEC proxy statement shows that its top six officers made over two million dollars from the company last year.

Perhaps this is why they may not seem to understand that many small business owners and ordinary ratepayers are still struggling quite a bit to get by, make ends meet, and put food on the table here in Clinton, Rhinebeck, and all over Dutchess County and the Hudson Valley-- and they are bold enough, again-- incredibly-- to ask for the "largest rate-increase request with the Public Service Commission since at least 1980," according to the front page of the Poughkeepsie Journal on July 30th.

Steven Lant: $590,000

Paul Ganci: $347,000

Carl Meyer: $350,000

Joseph DiVergilio, Jr.: $275,000

Arthur Upright: $269,000

Donna Doyle: $250,000

SCHEDULE 14A INFORMATION
Proxy Statement Pursuant to Section 14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
CH ENERGY GROUP, INC. 284 SOUTH AVENUE
POUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK 12601-4879
March 11, 2005
http://yahoo.brand.edgar-online.com/FetchFilingFrameset.aspx?FilingID=3531966&Type=HTML&PeopleFiling=true&FirstName=PAUL\%20J&LastName=GANCI

To the Holders of Common Stock:

I am pleased to invite you to the 2005 Annual Meeting of Shareholders of CH Energy Group, Inc. (the "Corporation").

The Annual Meeting of Shareholders will be held at the Corporation's office in Poughkeepsie, New York on Tuesday, April 26, 2005, at 10:30 AM. A Notice of the Annual Meeting of Shareholders and Proxy Statement are attached...

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

The Summary Compensation Table set forth below includes compensation information on the Chairman of the Board, President and Chief Executive Officer, the former Executive Chairman of the Board, and each of the Corporation's other four most highly compensated executive officers, whose salary and any bonus in 2004 exceeded $100,000, for services rendered to the Corporation and its subsidiary or affiliated companies.

SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE

NAME AND PRINCIPAL POSITIONS SALARY BONUS OTHER COMPENSATION

STEVEN V. LANT, Chairman, $413,258 $171,105 $6,500
President and Chief Executive
Officer of the Corporation,
Chairman and Chief Executive
Officer of Central Hudson,
Chairman, President and
Chief Executive Officer of
CHEC

PAUL J. GANCI, Executive $263,088 $81,000 $3,600
Chairman of the Board of the
Corporation, Executive
Chairman of the Board of
Central Hudson and of CHEC

CARL E. MEYER, Executive Vice $282,000 $62,816 $6,500
President of the Corporation and
President and Chief Operating
Officer of Central Hudson

JOSEPH J. DEVIRGILIO, JR., $220,000 $49,088 $6,500
Executive Vice President -
Corporate Services and
Administration of the
Corporation and of Central
Hudson; Executive Vice
President of CHEC

ARTHUR R. UPRIGHT, Senior $210,000 $53,550 $6,500
Vice President of the
Corporation; Senior Vice
President - Regulatory Affairs,
Financial Planning and
Accounting of Central Hudson

DONNA S. DOYLE, Vice President $195,000 $49,725 $6,500
of Accounting and Controller
of the Corporation and of
Central Hudson

Mr. Ganci served as the Corporation's Executive Chairman of the Board through April 27, 2004, when Mr. Lant was appointed Chairman of the Board in addition to his positions as President and Chief Executive Officer.

Mr. Lant became Chairman of the Board on April 27, 2004, following the Annual Meeting of Shareholders. He became Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Central Hudson on May 5, 2004, and Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of CHEC on May 10, 2004.

********************************************

"Utility Requests Rate Hike" by Craig Wolf
[Poughkeepsie Journal 7/30/05-- excerpt]

Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corp. Friday filed its largest rate-increase request with the Public Service Commission since at least 1980.

The filing begins an 11-month process almost certain to lead to rate increases, given the Poughkeepsie-based utility has not had a raise since 1993 for electricity and since 1991 for heating gas.

If the proposal is approved, the typical home customer could see a jump of about $10 per month for power and $20 per month for gas, when averaged over 12 months, company spokeswoman Denise VanBuren said. However, the commission's ultimate decision can differ markedly from the company proposal. Usually, the final raise is less.

In the filing, Central Hudson seeks an average increase for delivery charges of 34 percent for electricity and 48 percent for gas. But a customer's bill would not go up nearly that much, VanBuren said.

Rather, the total overall residential bill would rise an average of 17 percent for power and 16 percent for gas, she said...

The residential rise is higher, so that means the commercial and industrial rates aren't rising as much.

The public will be able to weigh in on the proposal, either as individuals or groups seeking "active party" status with the Public Service Commission or by attending public hearings that will be scheduled as the case moves on, commission spokeswoman Ann Dalton said.

"It's usually an 11-month process and it involves reviewing the application to understand...and verify accuracy of the numbers filed," she said.

The Rev. Alfred Twyman Jr., pastor of the Congregationalist Church in Poughkeepsie, noted the long period since the utility's last rate hikes and said, "That's pretty good." But nonetheless, a jump in prices for fuel and power will hurt some, he said.

"Whenever we have an increase in anything, food or gas or electricity or whatever, those folks who are struggling already pay the biggest price," he said.

Rates on the rise

Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corp. proposes to raise delivery charges.

* Bills for residential electricity customers would rise an estimated 17 percent, about $10 per month for the typical 500-kilowatt-hour bill.

* Bills for residential natural gas would go up about 16 percent, or about $20 per month.

* Business, industry and government bills will rise by differing rates.

What's next

* The Public Service Commission will assign a case number and docket the matter for an 11-month review. The Web site is http://www.dps.state.ny.us ; check "commission documents."

* Interested persons or groups can become "active parties" by applying to the commission and participate in the case, filing briefs.

* At some point, the commission will set one or more public hearings on the utility's proposal.

* Whatever changes are approved by the commission would likely take effect in June 2006.

* Details can be found at http://www.chenergygroup.com , under "rate proposal information."

Electricity rates

Historical rate increases sought by Central Hudson and granted by Public Service Commission:

Date Amt. req. Amt. Okd

7/18/81 13.3\% 11.8\%

10/22/82 11.1\% 5.3\%

1/16/84 6.2\% 3.2\%

4/20/85 9\% 3.8\%

9/10/85 * 0.5\%

7/25/86 5.5\% 3.4\%

7/25/87 3.8\% (2.5\%)

6/1/89 (0.8\%) (0.7\%)

5/24/90 5.5\% 3.5\%

12/21/93 3.7\% 1.3\%

7/1/01 8.8\% (1.3\%)

* Second part of a two-stage increase.

() Rate reduction

Natural gas rates

Historical rate increases sought by Central Hudson and granted by Public Service Commission:

Date Amt. req. Amt. OKd

7/18/81 7.1\% 6.1\%

10/22/82 5.9\% 3.6\%

1/16/84 2.8\% 4.5\%

4/20/85 4.2\% (0.2\%)

9/10/85 * 0.3\%

9/1/87 (5.2\%) (7\%)

7/8/91 7.4\% 5.3\%

12/21/931.9\% 0\%

2/19/98 3\% 0\%

7/2/01 4.7\% 0\%

* Second part of a two-stage increase.

() Rate reduction

********************************************

"Central Hudson seeks to raise gas, electric rates"
by Jonathan Ment [Daily Freeman 7/30/05-- excerpt]
http://www.dailyfreeman.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=14950192&BRD=1769&PAG=461&dept_id=74969&rfi=6

POUGHKEEPSIE - Brace yourself. That monster in your mailbox could get a whole lot scarier.

Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corp. has applied to the state to raise the rates the utility charges to deliver electricity and natural gas.

The request is the first step in an 11-month regulatory process, overseen by the state Public Service Commission, that will includes public hearings. Higher bills could arrive as soon as next summer.

But even without the proposed hikes, Central Hudson's 354,000 customers already are being hit in the wallet. Company spokesman John Maserjian said the average customer will pay 15 percent more this month than in July of 2004, largely because of higher energy costs.

If the new request to raise delivery rates is approved, Central Hudson's typical residential customer can expect to see their total electric bill increase by 17 percent, or roughly $10 per month, according to the utility.

The average residential natural gas customer, meanwhile, could see a hike of 16 percent, or $20 per month, when averaged over 12 months, according to Central Hudson...

A copy of the rate hike proposal and additional information regarding the reasons for the request can be found online at http://www.chenergygroup.com .

********************************************

"Electric Bills Jump"
By Jonathan Ment, Freeman staff 07/25/2005
http://www.dailyfreeman.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=14913722&BRD=1769&PAG=461&dept_id=74969&rfi=6

POUGHKEEPSIE - If the heat and humidity isn't making you hot under the collar, try comparing this year's Central Hudson bills with last year's.

An electric bill in June, for Central Hudson customers using 500 kilowatt hours, was up about 4.9 percent, to $58.83, over the bill a year earlier for $52.14, according to Central Hudson spokesman John Maserjian.

For July, the average customer will see an increase close to 15 percent over last year's bill.

The market price this month is 7.56 cents per kilowatt hour, reduced to 7.28 cents after energy contracts. That's up from 6.06 cents, with the effect of energy contracts bringing the cost down 0.65 cents in 2004.

The sample 500 kilowatt-hour bill includes delivery charges, customer credits and refunds, and state and local taxes, Maserjian said.

The increase, he said, is due to the expiration of some power contracts in 2004 and a higher wholesale price brought on by increased demand.

The contracts, which took effect after the sale of power plants required by the deregulation of the industry in New York state, affected pricing on a portion of the energy Central Hudson needed for delivery to customers.

"Energy contracts can serve to lower the market price of energy delivered," said Maserjian. "Some are fixed-price, some are a variable-price."

Today, most electricity delivered to customers is purchased by the utility on their behalf, Maserjian said. But Central Hudson charges the price it pays on the wholesale market, he said.

"Central Hudson introduced consolidated billing in November 2004. This permitted Central Hudson and independent marketers to offer a single bill option, which allows marketers to include their supply charges on Central Hudson's delivery bill for customers choosing an alternate supplier," he said.

As of June 30, 3,145 electric customers and gas customers are using independent suppliers. The number of electric customers buying their energy elsewhere has nearly doubled since December, when just 1,835 electric customers used independent suppliers.

During that same period, the number of Central Hudson's gas customers finding alternate suppliers increased from 1,227 to 1,469. The state Public Service Commission has ordered Central Hudson to end its natural gas fixed-price option by the fall of 2005. Maserjian said independent suppliers may be able to offer the option.

"This year, we've launched a program to promote customer choice," Maserjian said Friday. "I think it's in everyone's best interest to see what independent marketers have in terms of pricing for electricity and natural gas.

"Electric use, especially in the summertime, tends to be highest. Demand for power tends to raise the wholesale price," Maserjian said. "What we're seeing, so far, is our electric bills are still the lowest in the state."

********************************************

"Power Costs Rise Despite Deregulation - Some Asking What Became of Promised Lower Prices" by Jay Gallagher [7/23/05]
http://www.pulpny.org/html/power_costs_rise_despite_dereg.html

If the heat and humidity isn't making you hot under the collar, try comparing this year's Central Hudson bills with last year's.

An electric bill in June, for Central Hudson customers using 500 kilowatt hours, was up about 4.9 percent, to $58.83, over the bill a year earlier for $52.14, according to Central Hudson spokesman John Maserjian.

For July, the average customer will see an increase close to 15 percent over last year's bill.

The market price this month is 7.56 cents per kilowatt hour, reduced to 7.28 cents after energy contracts. That's up from 6.06 cents, with the effect of energy contracts bringing the cost down 0.65 cents in 2004.

The sample 500 kilowatt-hour bill includes delivery charges, customer credits and refunds, and state and local taxes, Maserjian said.

The increase, he said, is due to the expiration of some power contracts in 2004 and a higher wholesale price brought on by increased demand.

The contracts, which took effect after the sale of power plants required by the deregulation of the industry in New York state, affected pricing on a portion of the energy Central Hudson needed for delivery to customers.

"Energy contracts can serve to lower the market price of energy delivered," said Maserjian. "Some are fixed-price, some are a variable-price."

Today, most electricity delivered to customers is purchased by the utility on their behalf, Maserjian said. But Central Hudson charges the price it pays on the wholesale market, he said.

"Central Hudson introduced consolidated billing in November 2004. This permitted Central Hudson and independent marketers to offer a single bill option, which allows marketers to include their supply charges on Central Hudson's delivery bill for customers choosing an alternate supplier," he said.

As of June 30, 3,145 electric customers and gas customers are using independent suppliers. The number of electric customers buying their energy elsewhere has nearly doubled since December, when just 1,835 electric customers used independent suppliers.

During that same period, the number of Central Hudson's gas customers finding alternate suppliers increased from 1,227 to 1,469. The state Public Service Commission has ordered Central Hudson to end its natural gas fixed-price option by the fall of 2005. Maserjian said independent suppliers may be able to offer the option.

"This year, we've launched a program to promote customer choice," Maserjian said Friday. "I think it's in everyone's best interest to see what independent marketers have in terms of pricing for electricity and natural gas.

"Electric use, especially in the summertime, tends to be highest. Demand for power tends to raise the wholesale price," Maserjian said. "What we're seeing, so far, is our electric bills are still the lowest in the state."

********************************************

"Electricity Rates Rise with Temperature" by Jay Gallagher [7/23/05]
http://www.pulpny.org/html/electricity_rates_rise_with_te.html

ALBANY - Critics are wondering why deregulation of the power industry hasn't led to lower prices, as was promised when regulations were loosened a decade ago.

Some consumer groups as well as at least one energy company want the state to rethink its decision to put the state's supply of electricity into the hands of the private companies.

But the state's energy regulators as well as other industry officials think that the solution is more competition, not less.

The system was put to the test on Tuesday, when hot, muggy weather led to record demand on the system between 3 p.m. and 4 p.m.

Under the open-market system that has been in effect since 1999, the "peak" providers supplying energy on Long Island and in New York City got as much as $1,000 a megawatt hour, or more than 166 times the average price, for a short period of time.

The spike was too short-lived to make much of an impact on consumers' bills, and affected only the 5 percent of energy not supplied by longer-term deals, said Carol Murphy of the Independent System Operator, the organization that runs the state's wholesale-electric market.

But it does highlight the potential volatility of power prices when price is set by supply and demand rather than government fiat, critics said.

"There are too many people who depend on rate stability and bill predictability for their electricity and natural gas to expose them to the volatility of short-term markets," said Jerry Norlander of the Public Utility Law Project, a consumer group that favors a return to regulated pricing.

The consumers have a somewhat unlikely ally in Energy East, the company that owns two of the largest upstate utilities, Rochester Gas and Electric Corp. and New York State Electric and Gas Corp.

Those two utilities want the state's utility regulator, the Public Service Commission, to stop its attempts to lure people into buying their power from private companies rather than the utilities.

"They shouldn't force us out of the business," said Energy East President James Laurito.

Energy East officials say that rather than decline, the wholesale cost of electricity has more than doubled since prices were deregulated, from 1.8 cents a kilowatt hour in 1998 to 4.5 cents now.

But that's because the price of the most popular fuel used to make electricity - natural gas - has skyrocketed in that period, said David Flanagan of the Public Service Commission. "What we have said all along is that under competition prices would be lower than they would otherwise would have been under continued regulation," he said.

Although utilities no longer generate power, they still sell it, acting as middlemen between the new producers and customers, and still serve a majority of residential customers. They compete with private firms who also want to buy and sell the power.

The Public Service Commission last summer ordered utilities to figure out ways to increase the movement of customers to private service companies, the idea being that more players in the market would increase competition and lower prices. Most utilities accepted or embraced this ruling, but RGE and NYSEG are urging the commission to reconsider.

In response to the commission order, Orange and Rockland Utilities Inc., which serves customers in the lower Hudson Valley, started telling their customers that if they switched to a private supplier, their bills would be cut 7 percent for two months.

The utility now has almost a third of its electric customers and 40 percent of gas customers signed up with private suppliers.

"These customers vote with their feet," said company spokesman Michael Donovan. "We get very few complaints, very few returns." He said the average bill of average O&R customers has increased only modestly, from $71.81 in July 1999 to $74.69 now, since savings in other areas have helped to offset the increased price of wholesale electricity.

********************************************

"Zap! Electric Bills Rising; CenHud Blaming Markets"
by Michael Levensohn Raja Abdulrahim Middletown Record [7/21/05]
http://www.pulpny.org/html/zap.html

Zap! Electric Bills Rising; CenHud Blaming Markets

July 21, 2005 - Middletown Record - By Michael Levensohn Raja Abdulrahim

If you're a customer of Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corp., you might want to grab a stiff drink before opening your next bill.

The utility's electric customers can expect to pay about 15 percent more this July than they did a year ago, even if they use the same amount of power.

The higher bills are largely the result of Central Hudson's growing reliance on the state's deregulated power market. When Central Hudson sold its power plants to Dynegy Inc. in 2000, the companies signed a four-year contract allowing Central Hudson to buy varying amounts of power at fixed prices for four years.

That contract expired in October, leaving the utility at the whim of the state's power market, where prices are higher and more volatile than its customers are used to.

Central Hudson's market supply charge - the price it passes through to customers based on what it pays for electricity - is 7.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for July, said spokesman John Maserjian. Last July, with an assist from the Dynegy contract, the price was 5.4 cents per kwh.

Year-over-year, that's an increase of about 35 percent.

While the price Central Hudson pays for electricity is rising fast, the other portion of the utility's bills, delivery cost, is fixed, and mitigates the increase. A 35 percent jump in the market supply charge translates into roughly a 15 percent increase in the total bill.

A residential customer who uses 500 kilowatt-hours of energy in July will see an increase of about $9 compared with last year. Because of Central Hudson's rolling two-month billing cycle, the impact will vary, Maserjian said.

June's market supply charge was about 15 percent higher than a year ago, while May's was about 35 percent higher.

Those increases pose a threat to Central Hudson's standing as the state's lowest-cost provider of electricity. Since at least May, customers of neighboring Orange and Rockland Utilities have paid slightly less for their electricity than Central Hudson customers.

Maserjian said the company is encouraging its customers to consider switching to alternative power providers. As of the end of June 30, just 3,145 Central Hudson electric customers and 1,227 gas customers had switched suppliers.

In O&R's New York territory, some 67,000 electric and 45,000 gas customers have switched.

In another potential blow to Central Hudson customers' wallets, the state Public Service Commission ordered the utility yesterday to end its fixed-price program for natural gas by fall 2006. The Small Customer Marketer Coalition had petitioned the PSC in March asking for an end to the program, which it says gives Central Hudson a competitive advantage.

Last year, 14 percent of the utility's customers participated.

"It will certainly be a loss for those who like the security blanket," Central Hudson spokeswoman Denise VanBuren said.

The company has the option of offering the program for the last time this fall, but hasn't yet decided if it will.

Electricity usage sets record high

Turns out Central Hudson Gas & Electric set a record Tuesday, after all.

After conducting an early morning recount yesterday, the utility announced that it set a record for peak demand between 2 and 3 p.m. Tuesday, when customers used 1,144 megawatts of electricity. Preliminary data Tuesday afternoon had suggested the utility had come close to, but hadn't surpassed, the previous record of 1,143 megawatts set on June 13.

Tuesday's 24-hour total demand of 22,316 megawatt-hours of electricity also set a record.

CH Energy's profits rise

CH Energy Group reported net income of $6 million, or 37 cents per diluted share, for the second quarter of 2005, up from a profit of $5.5 million, or 34 cents per share, during the second quarter of 2004.

Revenue was $837.9 million, up from $786.7 million a year ago. CH Energy is the parent company of utility company Central Hudson Gas & Electric and fuel oil distributor Central Hudson Enterprises.





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Latest Signatures

  • 27 October 2015100. Sunil K
    I support this petition Address; Zip Code 12603
  • 28 August 201599. Douglas Cs
    Rates should only rise with costs, not so that greedy execs can make even more money. Address; Zip Code 44 Schultzville Rd., Staatsburg, NY 12580
  • 13 August 201598. Dana Jt
    Any hike in prices in today's economy is just another burden for those who are and will struggle through these hard times. Address; Zip Code 12545
  • 28 April 201597. Sue P
    Taking advantage of customers Address; Zip Code 23 Academy Street Fishkill NY
  • 17 April 201596. Vicky P
    I supprt a review of the rate hikes. Address; Zip Code 12571
  • 12 March 201595. Theresa F
    We don't need another increase! Address; Zip Code 12601
  • 18 February 201594. Karl Ak
    eneugh is eneugh-greed! Address; Zip Code 12603
  • 01 December 201493. Anne M
    Please come down on the side of need vs greed. Address; Zip Code 5752 Rt 9 Rhinebeck, NY 12572
  • 25 November 201492. Rick C
    Don't let it happen Address; Zip Code 59 2nd ave Kingston, NY
  • 23 October 201491. Cynthia P
    Central Hudson should not be allowed to use its monopoly to keep raising electricity rates. I am against this one for the reasons cited in the petition. Address; Zip Code P.O. Box 28, Rhinecliff, NY 12574
  • 26 September 201490. Maria A
    fair rates, no increases Address; Zip Code 14 beech st, rhinebeck, ny 12572
  • 19 July 201489. George Q
    I oppose unfair rates that make a few people wealthy at our expense. Address; Zip Code 124 Station Hill Rd, Barrytown, NY 12507
  • 15 June 201488. Rajesh J
    My delivery charges have gone up by more than 200\% (from $0.39 per CCF in Feb 2006 to $1.22 in Aug 2006)! This is outrageous. Address; Zip Code 12603
  • 28 December 201387. Christina D
    we deserve fair rates Address; Zip Code 25 Scott Drive Wappingers Falls, NY 12590
  • 08 November 201386. Ignacio C
    Hamburg,NJ Address; Zip Code 19 Amherst Court Hamburg, NJ 07419
  • 01 November 201385. Margaret Lc
    If CH Energy has had sizeable profits in the last year as they have there is no reason they should be granted an increase by the state in their rate structure. It falls on the backs of lower and middleclass residents who already are struggling with the in
  • 26 August 201384. Kerry M
    PUT SOME OF THE CORPORATE PROFITS BACK INTO THE COMMUNITY Address; Zip Code 227 SAND HILL ROAD DOVER 12522
  • 16 August 201383. Patricia St
    I am a retired 70 year old on a small fixed income, as are many other of your customers. Such a steep increase in rates as proposed would actually threaten many lives both in winter and summer. We live in an extreme and expensive climate and simply cannot
  • 04 July 201382. Maryann W
    Are you kidding me? Do the people running the utility companys have no shame? We are currently at the mercy of a government of big business that supports this type of behavior. Is no watching what is going on? Are we really helpless to stop the corporate
  • 29 June 201381. Janice Mv
    It is unreasonable to raise prices in light of your already significant profits. Don't take advantage of the public! Address; Zip Code 19 Monell avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY 12603
  • 12 March 201380. Sarah B
    This is an outrage! The number of people who rely on food pantries is on the rise in Dutchess County because as is now they can't afford their rent and utility bill. I am going to be joining them very soon! DO NOT INCREASE MY BILL! Address; Zip Code 22E W
  • 03 March 201379. Lisa K
    Please do not raise the rates - it's unaffordable Address; Zip Code 12590
  • 25 February 201378. Renee B
    This system of the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer has got to stop Address; Zip Code P.O. Box 13 Elk Mound Wisconsin 54739
  • 18 February 201377. Richard Pm
    central hudson is not cutting back its high salaries nor its high rates. we are not here on this earth to keep the ceo living in park avenue digs.central hudson is a heartless company. only a few years ago a judge proverd the point. Address; Zip Code 154
  • 10 January 201376. Kelly Pd
    Stop the high gas prices, this is getting ridiculous. Address; Zip Code 1128 Pershing St, Eau Claire, Wi 54703
  • 04 January 201375. John V
    CHGE is making it harder for the native people of this community to survive living here. Address; Zip Code 12 Birkdale Court 12603
  • 11 August 201274. Sampath S
    Please avoid rate hikes Address; Zip Code 26, Autumn Drive, NY 12603

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Elena TorresBy:
ReligionIn:
Petition target:
Central Hudson, NYS Public Service Commission, and Dutchess County Legislature

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