The Rhinebeck Recycling Petition sign now

Sign this petition and pass it along to all you know if you agree that the eighteen brown metal garbage baskets in the center of the small business district in the Village of Rhinebeck should have recycling receptacles next to them (I've lived here in the Town of Clinton since 1971 and went to Bulkeley Middle School and Rhinebeck High School, graduating in 1981; for decades I've wanted this-- but let's make 2010 the year this actually happens!).

Note-- thanks to Rhinebeck residents Paul Antonell, Margaret De Wys, Dan Maciejac, Vivian Mandala, Nicholas O'Connor, Marcia Slatkin, Michael West, and Chris Winham for already endorsing this idea-- point #6 of the countywide zero-waste petition I started last year (2009)-- for recycling bins to be placed next to all public trash receptacles across our county (see/sign www.petitiononline.com/zeroyes to join 78 folks from across Dutchess signed on).

Joel Tyner
County Legislator
Rhinebeck/Clinton
324 Browns Pond Road
Staatsburg, NY 12580
DutchessDemocracy.blogspot.com
[email protected]
Host of "The Real Majority Project" Fridays 5-6 pm on WVKR 91.3 FM
Host of "Common Sense" Saturdays 8-10 am on WHVW 950 AM
876-2488

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Fact: Hudson River Sloop Clearwater, Sierra Club, NYPIRG, EANY, and Citizens Environmental Coalition (all members of the New Yorkers for Zero Waste coalition) support a 85\% recycling rate by 2020-- not prolonging wasteful and polluting incineration indefinitely (and setting a goal of only 18\% by 2020, as the DCRRA has). The New Yorkers for Zero Waste coalition also knows that "recycling saves 4-5 times the energy an incinerator recovers"-- and that Dutchess County now incinerates and landfills $15 million worth of materials we could make money from instead through recycling and composting (see http://www.CECToxic.org )

Fact #1: Dutchess County now incinerates or sends to landfills $15 million worth of materials and resources that could be recycled, including plant debris, food waste, paper, wood, ceramics, soils, metals, glass, polymers, textiles, chemicals, and various items for reuse (Richard Anthony Associates).
[see: http://ccgovernment.carr.org/ccg/pubworks/sw-future/docs/resource-assessment.pdf MD like NYS!]

Fact #2: 500 new jobs could be created right here in Dutchess County if those materials were recycled instead of burned or buried, according to the Institute for Local Self-Reliance and Richard Anthony.
[see: http://www.ilsr.org/recycling/recyclingmeansbusiness.html ]

Fact #3: The cost of disposing of the Dutchess County Incinerator's 50,000 tons of toxic ash annually has doubled in recent years to three million dollars a year, according to Dutchess County Resource Recovery Agency Board Chair William Conners in a statement he made in Co. Leg. chambers in 2010.
[see: http://www.no-burn.org/why-incineration-is-a-very-bad-idea-in-the-twenty-first-century P. Connett]

Fact #4: The city of Springfield, Mass. has saved $75,000 in just the first half of this year alone by expanding recycling to one-third of the city; it expects to save $450,000 a year through greatly expanded recycling.
["Springfield Municipal Recycling Initiative To Expand" WAMC's Paul Tuthill July 23rd]
http://www.facebook.com/l/5e086TnJIxHhsEjo9ZH7biGHeXA;www.publicbroadcasting.net/wamc/news.newsmain/article/0/0/1679516/news/Municipal.Recycling.Initative.To.Expand ]

Fact #5: The Poughkeepsie Journal reported March 7th that emissions from our county incinerator of particulate matter, volatile organic compounds, and nitrogen oxide have all increased over the last decade-- along with the fact that, on an annual basis, our county incinerator also creates 50,000 tons of toxic ash-- and spews 29 pounds of heavy metals (mercury/arsenic/lead/cadmium), 37 tons of sulfur dioxide, 22 tons of hydrogen chloride/hydrogen fluoride, and 3700 tons of carbon dioxide.
http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/article/20100307/NEWS01/3070350/Burn-plants-seem-cleaner-but-facts-debated

Fact #6: The Poughkeepsie Journal reported March 7th that "the Dutchess County Resource Recovery Agency recycles only 4 percent of Dutchess' 250,000 tons of garbage; little is done to encourage recycling in the county; when waste recycled by private haulers is included, the county recycling rate is only 11 percent, about half the state rate, agency figures show; an estimated 30,000 tons of paper alone go to the trash heap yearly."
http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/article/20100307/NEWS01/3070352/Critics-rip-agency-as-recycling-falters

Here are the fifteen points Institute for Local Self-Reliance Pres. Neil Seldman has shared with us recently on WVKR/WHVW:

[go to http://www.DCRRA.org to weigh in now; email [email protected] on this too!]

1. Dutchess County as an economic development strategy needs to divert valuable materials in the wastestream to industry and agricultureas; there are many companies who want to locate in areas where materials are source-separated and treated as resources instead of garbage; unfortunately Dutchess County now cuts itself off from this economic activity, as too many of its leaders have not seriously considered the alternative to incinerating and landfilling 90 percent of its resources-- garbage.

2. Recycling and composting towards the goal of zero-waste creates literally ten times more jobs than incineration or landfilling; my colleague Brenda Platt here at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance proved this in her comprehensive study of over 114 recycling companies interviewed from all over the country.
[see: http://www.ilsr.org/recycling/recyclingmeansbusiness.html ]

3. Dutchess County needs to find 40 acres for ten counties to locate an eco-industrial resource recovery park to recycle/compost the Clean Dozen set out by Dr. Dan Knapp of Berkeley's Urban Ore-- paper, wood, ceramics, soils, metals, glass, polymers, textiles, chemicals, and various items for reuse-- while helping local, successful food-waste composting operations like Shabazz Jackson expand with different sites across the county [note from JT (me)-- I've actually reached out to DCEDC/DCIDA folks on this].

4. Atlanta recently started an industrial park market development zone through its Division of Sustainability; California has many such Resource Recovery Parks that could be models for Dutchess.

5. Alameda County has a Waste Reduction and Recycling Authority truly focused on recycling instead of incineration or landfilling; Dutchess County would do well to seriously consider such an option.
[see: http://www.stopwaste.org/home/index.asp?page=516 ;
http://recycling/recordsetters/index.html ; http://www.ilsr.org/pubs/pubswtow.html ]

6. Another example-- Peninsula Composting manages a 300,000 ton/year facility in Wilmington, DE that accepts food waste from supermarkets that are only too glad to send it there-- as it costs them 20\% less to send their food waste there compared to local landfills.

7. Peninsula Composting also manages recycling operation in Nantucket-- with a 92\% diversion rate.

8. San Francisco has a 72\% recycling rate; Los Angeles has a 64\% recycling rate; King County (Washington) has a 62\% recycling rate [and, as Paul Connett pointed out in a talk at Vassar this Earth Day, there are communities in Italy that have gotten up to a 70\% recycling rate in literally just 18 months]-- there's no reason why Dutchess couldn't do this as well; where there's a will there's a way.

9. While I was in your area last year I visited the Coeymans Marine Industrial Terminal about an hour north of you in the Capital District-- which recycles glass barged up there from NYC that had previously been considered almost worthless and turns it into a product that sells at $100 a ton.

10. HDPE (plastic #2) could stay in county (plastic from milk jugs and juice jugs) to make other products.
Some communities have banned yard debris and food waste from being sent to incinerator or landfills-- there's no reason why Dutchess County couldn't do this.

11. Toronto is now saving tax dollars on waste disposal costs by collecting garbage only once every other week instead of weekly-- because they're collected food waste weekly; they have dual-stream trucks that collects garbage and food waste one week, and garbage and recyclables the next week.
[and-- check out http://www.Cool2012.com -- dozens of communities in U.S. with food-waste collection]

12. Food waste and yard waste typically are almost half of the wastestream across the country. Los Angeles and San Francisco are creating high-quality topsoil and black soil from composted food waste-- and selling it to farmers in their region. Some communities feed food waste into anaerobic digesters to create methane gas or compressed natural gas to sell back to the grid or provide fuel for their police or bus fleet.

13. Repairables and reusables make up only 5\% of the wastestream-- but comprise half of the potential value of the wastestream. Adding value creates wealth and jobs-- at St. Vincent DePaul repair and reuse centers, 350 workers in six different companies making $12/hour with medical and dental benefits fix refrigerators, appliances, computers, furniture-- there's no reason why Dutchess couldn't facilitate this locally as well.

14. Kristen Brown communities often see a 45\% increase in wastestream diversion through PAYT.
[sadly, DCRRA plan for "user fee" based on property class ignores PAYT (pay-as-you-throw) concept;
see http://www.epa.gov/osw/conserve/tools/payt/ for more on the many benefits of pay-as-you-throw]

15. Noted conservative Edmund Burke stated hundreds of years ago that elected officials are supposed to do now for their constituents what they would want to have done ten years hence."

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More on this from WasteAgeNews.com...

Recycling Goes Public

Feb 1, 2006 12:00 PM, Jennifer Grzeskowiak

INCREASINGLY, SPORTS STADIUMS and concert venues are providing fans with recycling bins for their empty beverage containers. But for pedestrians in most U.S. cities, recycling plastic bottles or aluminum cans means holding onto them until getting home. That dilemma prompted Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley to bring recycling containers to traffic-heavy parts of the city, a solution that slowly is cropping up across the country.

In July, as part of a pilot program, the city teamed up with Kingsport, Tenn.-based Outdoor Partner Media to place 26 bins in and around the downtown area. The company provides Baltimore with the containers for free and sells advertising space on them to generate revenue, which is shared with the city. And for every 25 bins on the streets, the city gets to promote its own campaigns or programs on three of them. In exchange, Baltimore is responsible for collecting and disposing the recyclables, which include plastic, aluminum and paper.

Within one month of beginning the pilot program, the city requested 30 more of the 90-gallon receptacles created by Dunkirk, Md.-based Victor Stanley and placed some of them in outlying areas. While the city has not yet compiled statistics on the amount of recyclables collected, Robert Murrow, spokesperson for Baltimore City Public Works, says that the containers are really being used by people.

Baltimore now is working out some of the issues with its program. For instance, while the containers have a clearly labeled slot for trash and holes for plastic and aluminum, some areas have had problems with contamination. As we put them in outlying areas, contamination has been more of a problem, says Steve Blake, engineer for Baltimore City Public Works. We are still experimenting with different situations and locations. The city also has decided to phase out advertising from alcohol and cigarette companies.

The pilot program will be in place until June, when the city will decide whether to continue it. So far, everything we've heard, from businesses to residents, has been positive, Blake says.

With one large city under its belt, Outdoor Partner Media now is working with St. Louis to roll out a program. Until Baltimore, the company focused on smaller cities, working with several of them to resolve problems with the system. We've deliberately taken a one-step-at-a-time approach, says President Ari Huber.

Other cities have taken a different approach to recycling by shouldering the costs. Santa Barbara, Calif., for example, has been putting recycling containers in public places for more than three years. While haulers provide the more than 400 metal temporary containers in public parks, the city pays for the permanent ones.

Santa Barbara began the program by putting containers on 10 blocks of State Street, a main tourist spot filled with restaurants. The city now has 670 recycling containers in place and intends to add 100 in the next 18 months. The program keeps approximately 700 to 800 tons of waste per year out of landfills.

Santa Barbara also is experimenting with ways to reduce contamination. We have put a lot of energy into signage and labeling, says recycling coordinator Edward France. While this has helped, the city is becoming more aggressive in its efforts. Until recently, separate recycling containers were placed next to trash cans, and two haulers would empty the bins. Santa Barbara now is testing another option by installing containers with an upper section for recyclables and a lower section for trash. The scavenger containers are intended to allow people to take the recyclables, which France says should reduce contamination and prevent a hauler from having to pick them up.


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Recycling Bins in Public Places
By Patrick J Hills

There are several kinds of recycling containers that can be deployed in high traffic areas like public places where a lot of waste is generated. Some of these places include parks, stadiums, cinemas, airports, shopping malls, etc. Various companies like Rubbermaid, Woodie, Safco, Ecolad manufacture recycle bins that are specially meant for public places. These recycling bins are robustly constructed and are strong and durable enough to be easily placed there. Most of these recycling bins are resistant to extreme weather conditions which makes them perfect for outdoor. Recycle bins deployed at those sites are categorized under the following heads:

o Single Stream Recycling Containers: The single stream recycling containers are those in which everything can be disposed of in a single recycle container. Various items range from cans, bottles, paper, packaging material, etc. The advantage of using these containers is that it eliminates the need of separate recycling container for different kinds of. This also removes the need of separate compartments in trucks that carries the waste to recycling stations.

o Special Purpose Recycling Containers: Those containers which allow the disposal of different type of recyclable refuse separately into different containers are called special purpose recycling bins. Aluminum can crushers are a perfect example of such containers, they can be used in public places to collect aluminum soda and beer cans. Paper recycling bins are another type and can be used in offices, libraries, and bookstores to collect waste papers and send it for recycling.

o Multi-Specialty Recycling Containers: Multi-Specialty recycling bins can be used for waste collection in homes as well as public places. These are very cost effective because they come with multiple openings or lids that allow easy separation of waste material like aluminum, glass, plastic and trash.

Placing recycle bins in public places can greatly help in the collection of recyclable materials and also reduce the problem of garbage in public places. You can buy recycling bins [http://www.recyclingsupply.com/recycling-article.html] from some of the top manufacturers like Rubbermaid, Ecolad and Waste Warrior at http://www.recyclingsupply.com/reccon.html.

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[here-- Tyner/Goldberg/Jeter-Jackson/Doxsey resolution that GOP refuse to embrace thus far, sadly]

WHEREAS, Dutchess County now incinerates or sends to landfills $15 million worth of materials and resources that could be recycled, including plant debris, food waste, paper, wood, ceramics, soils, metals, glass, polymers, textiles, chemicals, and various items for reuse, according to Richard Anthony Associates, and 500 new jobs could be created right here in Dutchess County if those materials were recycled instead of burned or buried, according to the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, and

WHEREAS, the cost of disposing of the Dutchess County Incinerator's 50,000 tons of toxic ash annually has doubled in recent years to three million dollars a year, according to Dutchess County Resource Recovery Agency Board Chair William Conners, and

WHEREAS, the Poughkeepsie Journal reported May 7th that "if Dutchess County does not submit a new solid waste management plan to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation by Aug. 1, the Dutchess County Resource Recovery Agency might lose its operating permit next year," and

WHEREAS, the Poughkeepsie Journal reported May 10th last year that the Dutchess County incinerator "costs 46 percent more to operate than 13 other plants in New York and Connecticut and has debts stretching years beyond all of them," and

WHEREAS, although the Dutchess County Incinerator produces power from burning trash, the income does not come close to covering costs, and neither do the tipping fees that are among the highest in the region; in recent years, Dutchess County taxpayers have seen the county's subsidy to the Resource Recovery Agency go from $2 million to $6.3 million, with more increases expected, and

WHEREAS, the Poughkeepsie Journal reported March 7th that emissions from our county incinerator of particulate matter, volatile organic compounds, and nitrogen oxide have all increased over the last decade-- along with the fact that, on an annual basis, our county incinerator also creates 50,000 tons of toxic ash-- and spews 29 pounds of heavy metals (mercury/arsenic/lead/cadmium), 37 tons of sulfur dioxide, 22 tons of hydrogen chloride/hydrogen fluoride, and 3700 tons of carbon dioxide, and

WHEREAS, the Poughkeepsie Journal reported March 7th that "the Dutchess County Resource Recovery Agency recycles only 4 percent of Dutchess' 250,000 tons of garbage; little is done to encourage recycling in the county; when waste recycled by private haulers is included, the county recycling rate is only 11 percent, about half the state rate, agency figures show; an estimated 30,000 tons of paper alone go to the trash heap yearly," and

WHEREAS, the Daily Freeman reported April 28th that "Ulster County residents recycled more than 64,000 tons of materials in 2009, nearly doubling the amount diverted from the waste stream in 2005; the increase in recycling, combined with a dropoff in the amount of nonrecyclable garbage produced in the past two years, has pushed the county closer to the state goal of recycling 42 percent of the waste stream," and

WHEREAS, communities across the country like Austin, Portland, Seattle, Oakland, and many more have proven that a zero-waste approach to resource recovery can save tax dollars, create more jobs, clean up air quality, with lower carbon emissions, compared to incineration or landfilling, and

WHEREAS, the United States has lost half the carbon in its soils and half of what is buried in landfills is organics (yard trimmings, food scraps and food soiled paper); landfills are the single largest source of human-created methane gas and contribute significantly to climate change; we need to get organics out of landfills and back to the soil, and
WHEREAS, Royal Carting is starting a food-waste curbside collection demonstration project with 177 homes in Beacon; the towns of Hamilton and Wenham in Massachusetts started curbside collection of food waste this year and are saving tax dollars; here in Dutchess County Vassar and Marist colleges compost their food waste, along with many restaurants in Tompkins County, and the communities of Portland, Seattle, Boulder, Cambridge, Wegman's Supermarket and Wal-Mart in Onondaga County, NY, Central Vermont Solid Waste Management District, San Francisco, CA, Morgan Hill, CA, Dublin, CA, Alameda County, CA, Pleasanton, CA, Hutchinson, MN, Hennepin County, MN, San Leandro, CA, Union City, CA, Swift County, MN, King County, WA, Bowdoinham, ME, San Jose, CA, Newark, CA, Orange County, NC, Berkeley, CA, Western Lake Superior Sanitary District, MN, Livermore, CA, Mackinaw Island, MI, and
WHEREAS, it has repeatedly been proven across the country in these communities that food-waste curbside collection is a win-win for homeowners, businesses, and waste haulers; all end up saving money as tipping fees at compost facilities are lower than tipping fees at incinerators or landfills, and if food waste is collected regularly, trash doesn't have to be collected so often, and therefore be it

RESOLVED, that the Dutchess County Legislature urges the Dutchess County Solid Waste Commissioner and the Dutchess County Resource Recovery Agency to work together to incorporate the following in its Solid Waste Management Plan for Dutchess County submitted to the NYSDEC: to set a recycling goal for Dutchess County of 70\% by 2015 and 90\% by 2020, and to work with the Dutchess County Association of Supervisors and Mayors, Dutchess County Economic Development Corporation, and Dutchess County Industrial Development Agency to site an eco-industrial resource recovery park and food-waste composting facilities to process source-separated organic materials, and to ensure recycling containers are placed wherever there are trash containers, and be it further

RESOLVED, that the Dutchess County Legislature requests that licensed waste haulers in Dutchess County collect food waste with lower rates for clean, source-separated materials, and reuse, recycle or compost at least 50\% of all materials and bulky items collected by them in Dutchess County, and be it further

RESOLVED, that the Dutchess County Legislature urges the Dutchess County Solid Waste Commissioner and the Dutchess County Resource Recovery Agency to phase out as quickly as possible incineration or landfilling of easily recyclable materials; no compostable organics should be burned at the Dutchess County Incinerator or sent to landfills, and be it further

RESOLVED, that the Dutchess County Legislature urges the Dutchess County Solid Waste Commissioner and the Dutchess County Resource Recovery Agency to work together to make sure that all Dutchess County all residents, businesses and institutions source-separate reusables, recyclables and compostables (including discarded food, and food contaminated paper), and be it further

RESOLVED, that the Dutchess County Legislature urges the Dutchess County Director of Central Services to purchase only products with reusability, recyclability and compostability, and requests thatthe Dutchess County Department of Public Works specify in all of its contracts for major construction (e.g., roads, parks, public buildings) the use of reused, recycled and compost products; all packaging for products sold in stores in Dutchess County should be reusable, recyclable, or compostable by 2020, and be if further

RESOLVED, that a copy of this resolution be sent to the Dutchess County Executive, Dutchess County Solid Waste Commissioner, Dutchess County Resource Recovery Agency, Dutchess County Director of Central Services, Dutchess County Department of Public Works, and all other county departments.


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Katheryn StevensonBy:
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Rhinebeck residents

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