Pharmacy Technician Regulation Must Change sign now

Pharmacy Technicians in New Brunswick would like to share their concerns about some of the requirements and steps to regulation for pharmacy technicians, as developed by the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada.

We support the regulation of the pharmacy technician profession and agree that there should be standards of practice, however we feel a new and more reasonable regulation process is needed. We urge the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada to develop a new registration process which finds a more reasonable balance between ensuring public safety and minimizing the time and costs to the people who have been working as pharmacy technicians for many years.

We support the the following letter that was sent from the Canadian Health Professionals Secretariat to PEBC
Dear Mr. Gdyczynski,
We are writing on behalf of the Canadian Health Professionals Secretariat (CHPS) to share our concerns about
some of the requirements and steps to regulation for pharmacy technicians, as developed by the Pharmacy
Examining Board of Canada.
CHPS is a national advocacy body that represents more than 70,000 unionized health science professionals
who deliver the diagnostic, clinical, rehabilitation and preventive services that are essential to timely and
quality health care. Some of the highly trained professionals represented by CHPS include pharmacists,
pharmacy technicians, occupational therapists, respiratory therapists, physiotherapists, medical lab
technologists, social workers, medical radiation technologists, dietitians and psychologists.
The provincial health science unions which are members of CHPS include:
п Health Sciences Association of BC (HSABC)
п BC Government and Service Employeesв Union (BCGEU)
п Health Sciences Association of Alberta (HSAA)
п Saskatchewan Government and General Employeesв Union (SGEU)
п Health Sciences Association of Saskatchewan (HSAS)
п Manitoba Government and General Employeesв Union (MGEU)
п Manitoba Association of Health Care Professionals (MAHCP)
п Ontario Public Service Employees Union (OPSEU)
п New Brunswick Union of Public and Private Employees (NBU)
п Nova Scotia Government and General Employees Union (NSGEU)
п PEI Union of Public Sector Employees (PEIUPSE)
п Newfoundland & Labrador Association of Public and Private Employees (NAPE)
п Association of Allied Health Professionals Newfoundland & Labrador (AAHP)
We represent about 2,500 pharmacy technicians across the country. While they are primarily employed in
hospital settings, a small number are employees at retail and private outpatient pharmacies.
CHPS supports regulation of the pharmacy technician profession. We agree that standards of practice and
accountability are important aspects of the provision of safe and effective health care to Canadians. We are
fully cognizant of the invaluable role, but also the potential danger posed by the myriad of pharmaceutical
products available to patients. A safe and effective delivery system for prescription drugs is a critical
component of quality health care.
п Canadian Health Professionals Secretariat (CHPS)
п 15 Auriga Dr / Nepean, Ontario / K2E 1B7
п PH: 613в228в9800 / FAX: 613в228в9801
2
We support most of the framework for pharmacy technician regulation that is being put in place nationally and
provincially. However, our pharmacy technician members have raised with us a number of specific concerns
about the requirements and steps to regulation. We would like to share those concerns with the Pharmacy
Examining Board of Canada and urge the Board to take steps to address these concerns.
Our pharmacy technician members have five major concerns:
1. They are not deemed qualified for registration because they graduated prior to the whatever arbitrary
date that has been set for the accreditation of pharmacy technician education programs in their
province;
2. They have to вreвqualifyв to do a job they have been doing for years;
3. The lack of a вgrandparentingв process for current technicians;
4. The high personal costs of the bridging program, in terms of time and money;
5. The lack of job security if they do not pursue registration.
Our members are concerned that provincial Colleges are saying they will only вrecognize pharmacy technician
programs that have received accreditation from the Canadian Council for Accreditation of Pharmacy Programs
(CCAPP)в. The first accreditation of Pharmacy Programs did not occur until 2008. Yet the vast majority of our
members are graduates of programs that have been considered the вgold standardв including the program at
Red Deer College in Alberta and the program at the Michener Institute in Ontario. These members are being
told they are not qualified for registration simply because they obtained their education prior to the arbitrary
date of 2008. They are being advised by the provincial Colleges that they will have to complete an extensive
and expensive вbridgingв program.
We recognize that pharmacy technician education programs have evolved, as have those of every other
profession, health or otherwise. Without question, a technician graduating today will have more knowledge
than a technician graduating in 1990. However, like other professions, pharmacy technicians, regulated or not,
have engaged in ongoing education and training.
In the hospital setting, this has been demanded of them by employers due to rapid developments in the field.
In other settings the specialized services being provided demand that such ongoing training occurs. Indeed, we
argue that innovations that have become commonplace practice often began in clinical settings long before
they became part of a formal curriculum. These innovations were driven by needs identified by clinicians of
various professions and by the needs of patients taking the medications.
The bridging process proposed by the provincial Colleges is very costly for our members in terms of time and
money. For example, a technician who has practiced her profession for the past 15 years in a hospital setting,
who has been mentoring students, supervising other staff and even teaching the practice of pharmacy
technician, will be required, at minimum, to take one course, write four subject exams and two comprehensive
exams, and spend approximately $3,000 to do so в just to be able to continue practicing the profession and
call herself a pharmacy technician.
If the technician fails to complete this bridging process she will be prohibited, as of the date determined by
each province, to use the title вPharmacy Technicianв, or to perform many duties and tasks that she has
capably done for years, and duties she has taught the very students who have now graduated from an
вaccredited programв. Indeed, she will be prohibited from teaching her profession to the next generation of
professionals.
п Canadian Health Professionals Secretariat (CHPS)
п 15 Auriga Dr / Nepean, Ontario / K2E 1B7
п PH: 613в228в9800 / FAX: 613в228в9801
3
We are aware of no other profession that, on moving from unregulated to regulated status, required its
members to effectively reвqualify to practice. Our experience and information indicate that the usual practice
has been for prospective members to verify, within a specific time period, that they have been practicing the
profession, and then they have been permitted to register. New entrants to the profession were then required
to meet whatever standards the profession determined to be appropriate. Of the pharmacy technicians
represented by CHPS, the vast majority believe that some form of вgrandparentingв should be extended to
them. Most of them have, after all, demonstrated the competencies to practice safely and effectively within
the scope of their profession for many years.
We are mindful of the range of education programs and practice models among those who have used the title
вPharmacy Technicianв, and we appreciate that the determination of competence and safety for the public are
paramount. However, we also note that many professionals, including pharmacy technicians, after successful
completion of their general core program, work in a particular, or specialized, setting. Their knowledge and
expertise in such a setting will be sound and often far exceeds the level they achieved at graduation.
It is trite to say that practice makes perfect. By the same token, lack of exposure to certain areas of practice
will invariably result in a deterioration of skills. It is for this reason that most, if not all, professions require their
members to engage in continuing education and to complete a reвentry program after absences exceeding a
preвdetermined time. In some provinces, continuing competence is a legislated requirement.
Pharmacy technicians are no different. Their practice is commonly confined to a hospital or retail setting,
where different skills and competencies are required. Thus a retail pharmacy technician will be unlikely to
participate in sterile preparation, for example, and would not be expected, nor would it be practical, to
maintain that competence. Nevertheless, he or she is quite competent to practice within the retail
environment.
Our members suggest that a practice permit that would restrict a technician to the setting in which he or she
has been working would adequately meet the needs of the profession and protect the public. Such conditional
practice permits are authorized in various provincial legislative Acts regulating health professionals. At most,
an evaluation process that covers their practice setting would more effectively and efficiently determine
competence without jeopardizing public health.
Our members suggest that such a circumscribed evaluation, coupled with a practice permit that would restrict
them to that setting, would be much more appropriate than the comprehensive evaluation. Should a
technician then elect to change to a practice setting not covered by the conditional permit, then additional
evaluation or education would be appropriate.
Finally, some of our members who have been competently practicing the profession for years are concerned
about their job security if they do not pursue registration. In fact, some of them have indicated they will simply
leave the profession rather spend thousands of dollars and many hours, and take on the additional stress and
demands, in pursuing registration for a job theyвve already been doing for years.
This would be a tremendous loss for patients and the overall health care system. Our members who choose
not to participate in a bridging program or to pursue registration would lose the ability to contribute their full
п Canadian Health Professionals Secretariat (CHPS)
п 15 Auriga Dr / Nepean, Ontario / K2E 1B7
п PH: 613в228в9800 / FAX: 613в228в9801
skills, knowledge and expertise to patients, new technicians entering the workforce and the health care system
to which they have devoted themselves their entire career.
4
In conclusion, while CHPS and its pharmacy technician members support and understand the concept and the
purpose of regulating professionals, we believe the proposed process is unnecessarily heavy handed.
We urge the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada to work with the provincial Colleges to develop a new
registration process which finds a more reasonable balance between ensuring public safety and minimizing the
time and costs to our members who have been working as pharmacy technicians for many years.
We would appreciate an opportunity to discuss our concerns further with you and to learn more about the
positions of the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada.
Sincerely,
Elisabeth Ballermann,


However we also have some additional concerns.

1. There is no place within our own province for us to write the exams. The closest location to write The Pharmacy Technician Evaluating Examination is in Halifax NS.
2. Once you have passed the Evaluating Exam the next step is to complete bridging programs before proceeding to write the Pharmacy Technician Qualifying Examination. These programs are not offered anywhere on the east coast and are very costly
3. If we ever manage to have access to a bridging program and complete it the closest location to then write the Qualifying exam is in Ottawa ON.

Sign The Petition

Sign with Facebook sign_with_twitter
OR

If you already have an account please sign in, otherwise register an account for free then sign the petition filling the fields below.
Email and the password will be your account data, you will be able to sign other petitions after logging in.

Privacy in the search engines? You can use a nickname:

Attention, the email address you supply must be valid in order to validate the signature, otherwise it will be deleted.

I confirm registration and I agree to Usage and Limitations of Services

I confirm that I have read the Privacy Policy

I agree to the Personal Data Processing

Shoutbox

Who signed this petition saw these petitions too:

Sign The Petition

Sign with Facebook sign_with_twitter
OR

If you already have an account please sign in

Comment

I confirm registration and I agree to Usage and Limitations of Services

I confirm that I have read the Privacy Policy

I agree to the Personal Data Processing

Goal
0 / 50

Latest Signatures

No one has signed this petition yet

Information

Tags

No tags

Share

Invite friends from your address book

Embed Codes

direct link

link for html

link for forum without title

link for forum with title

Widgets